Monday, October 02, 2006

Kissinger's Peanutsegy and Hitchens

One of the very small number of scoops in Bob Woodward's new book has to do with Dr. K's influence Bush's Iraq policy. I was particularly intrigued by his use of metaphors:
In a meeting with presidential speechwriter Michael Gerson in early September 2005, Kissinger was more explicit: Bush needed to resist the pressure to withdraw American troops. He repeated his axiom that the only meaningful exit strategy was victory.

"The president can't be talking about troop reductions as a centerpiece," Kissinger said. "You may want to reduce troops," but troop reduction should not be the objective. "This is not where you put the emphasis."

To emphasize his point, he gave Gerson a copy of a memo he had written to President Richard M. Nixon, dated Sept. 10, 1969. "Withdrawal of U.S. troops will become like salted peanuts to the American public; the more U.S. troops come home, the more will be demanded,"he wrote.

The Salted Peanuts Model of Troop Withdrawal.
Someone should tell Kissinger that he needs to adapt to the age of diet freaks and come up with cool metaphors (Survivor, Paris Hilton, iPod,etc.) In any case, I'm not sure why Kissinger didn't use something more simple and classic involving addictions, say alcoholism. Like in "Withdrawal of U.S. troops will become like alcohol to Christopher Hitchens; the more U.S. troops come home, the more will be demanded." Christopher Hitchens being now Dr. K's close ideological pal.

1 comment:

Adam Elkus said...

Kissinger is the exception that proves the rule. Cheney and Rumsfeld both got their start in the Nixon White House. Part of this administration's pathological obsession with secrecy and disregard for legality owes from Cheney's yearning for the golden days.

As for Hitchens, I think he'll eventually have a near-death experience after getting into a drinking contest with Mel Gibson. Then Hitchens will become a born-again Christian and renounce eveything.